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Review: The Amity Affliction – Let The Ocean Take Me

After the years of distractions, this is The Amity Affliction at their full capability – totally focussed on producing their heaviest, catchiest and most refined work yet. 

Joel Birch

Photo by Sandra Markovic.

In spite of the actual musical content of Let The Ocean Take Me, this record is an important one for Australian heavy music at large. Can these chart-destroying monsters replicate their homegrown success internationally or are they destined to do a Powderfinger? Will Northlane, Thy Art Is Murder, Twelve Foot Ninja and King Parrot’s international incursions reap the benefits of this extra exposure for Australian Metal™? Can a band content with shunning progression captivate and grow their audience? The answer it seems is a resounding yes on all counts.

While Youngbloods crystallised the previous years of Amity to perfection, its follow up Chasing Ghosts was an overly safe formulaic run-through of the same ideas. It did the job commercially but lacked the knockout punch of fan favourite “I Hate Hartley.”

Enter Let The Ocean Take Me. Utilising metal producer du jour Will Putney at guitarist Troy Brady’s home studio has reaped dividends while the inclusion of former Confession/50 Lions guitarist and ghostwriting guru Dan Brown has seemingly sparked the group’s collective drive. First single “Pittsburgh” has a huge chorus, more intricate arrangement than what you’d expect from the group and is already dominating the charts while “Never Alone” will surely be this album’s watershed moment. Rolling on a snappy groove that fully explores the group’s pop aspirations, while managing to get a bit of double bass chugging in for the moshers, expect it to be absolutely everywhere in short time. “Death’s Hand” is the flip side, a punishing rhythm alternating with skittering drumming from Ryan Burt, a catchy guitar line, huge pit call and breakdowns that would have fit Brown’s old outfit. Closer “Give It All” is another monstrous track, the inclusion of a children’s choir with another ripping chorus closing the album on a high note.

If you never liked the band this won’t change your mind but fans will be over the moon, repeated listens revealing more each run-through. After the years of distractions, this is The Amity Affliction at their full capability – totally focussed on producing their heaviest, catchiest and most refined work yet. Two thumbs up.

The Essential Track: That’s Real Bad from Deez Nuts melting down at the end of “Never Alone”.

The Amity Affliction
availble-on-itunes

 

 

 

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